Listening/reading log #8 (May 2020)

I don’t have anything funny to open with this time (assuming I ever did anyway.) You don’t need me to tell you; if you live in the US just open a window and you’ll hear it. Between the righteous fury of the people, the imminent threat of military forces occupying the streets, and the coronavirus that hasn’t gone away, we’re living a fucking apocalypse over here.

All the more reason for you to put on relaxing music to get away from a while, even if only for an hour. So let’s do that: in contrast to the instability, lack of leadership from the top, and total political incompetence going on right now in my country, I’m focusing this month on music to wind down to.

Getz/Gilberto (Stan Getz & João Gilberto, 1964)

Highlights: The Girl from Ipanema, Doralice, O Grande Amor

In my very first listening/reading log post back in October, the first album I highlighted was Antonio Carlos Jobim’s Wave. If you liked that, you’ll probably like Getz/Gilberto as well, because it’s a similar style of nice relaxing bossa nova and it also features Jobim as you can read on the cover. The main players here are naturally the guys the album’s named after, however: American saxophonist Stan Getz and Brazilian guitarist João Gilberto. These guys were already both quite famous when this album came out, and for good reason, because they’re good at what they do.

“The Girl from Ipanema” is one of those songs you’ve definitely heard even if you don’t recognize the name — it’s been covered probably hundreds of times by now. It also features Gilberto’s wife Astrud on vocals, alternating his own lines in Portuguese with hers in English. There are plenty of nice lesser-known tracks on Getz/Gilberto as well, especially the short, catchy “Doralice” and somber-sounding “O Grande Amor”. This is the kind of music that sets a certain mood, and it’s very good at doing that. As with Wave, put it on when you get a drink and sit out in the warm summer night (well, maybe not right at the moment depending on your location, but you know what I mean.)

Dummy (Portishead, 1994)

Highlights: Sour Times, It Could Be Sweet

I don’t know about listing Dummy as being in the “relaxing” category. It’s very chilled out but also very downbeat — like Getz/Gilberto it does well at setting a tone, but this time the tone is depression. Singer Beth Gibbons sounds like she’s really emotionally beaten down in some of these songs with her subdued tone — I don’t know if she actually was, but it sounds real enough if it’s an act.

But Portishead is the kind of music that I sometimes put on to relax, which may say more about me than about the music. Really, this is music to listen to after you have a bad break-up and you’re sitting in an old-fashioned cafe at 1 in the morning drinking coffee and wondering why the hell you stuck with it for so long, what were you thinking all that time letting her just do that to you.

Sorry, this got a little personal. Maybe I just found this album at a weird time in my life and now I associate it with that. Anyway, forget about my personal issues and look up Dummy, it’s good.

Neon Impasse (City Girl, 2018)

Highlights: Ji-eun’s Sunset, Neon Impasse

If you liked that lo-fi hip hop girl YouTube channel I linked a few weeks ago, you should also check out City Girl. All her (his? their? I guess I can’t just assume from the name but whatever) albums seem to be listed on YouTube as well. I’ve recently been listening to some of it while working, and it puts me in a very nice place while I’m digging through stacks of horribly tedious documents. It’s chilled out electronic with jazz and that lo-fi stuff mixed in. A couple of tracks don’t quite do it for me, but I think the above-linked ones give a good impression of how most of the album sounds.

And now, featured posts made by my fellow writers. Ten of them, which is a lot, but chances are you have the time to read all of them now:

Blogging in Quarantine Times — Irina addresses the ways in which the global quarantine has been affecting her experience writing online. I can relate to a lot of what she brings up in this post, and I’m sure many other blog writers and hobbyists like us can as well.

On Making “Good” Content — Why do we write blogs about the media we like? Lethargic Ramblings gives his own opinion on the value of simply writing what you feel like without worrying about whether it seems any good to other people. I firmly believe that if you write about your own interests with feeling, it will naturally attract at least a few readers who pick up on your passion, and I think Leth’s post illustrates that view very well.

Miru Tights: A Down-to-Earth Ecchi Devoid of Discomfort — I really appreciate people who take on the more erotic and/or pornographic sorts of works without any reservations, and so I liked Inskime’s review of Miru Tights, an ecchi anime with a focus on girls’ tights, socks, and legs in general. Inskime gives some excellent insight on why this is a series worth watching even for those who don’t share its very specific interest in girls’ legs and legwear. Not something I would have ever imagined, but Inskime is quite persuasive, so give it a read if you’re interested.

Evercade: The Case for Curated Retro Gaming — As the title suggests, Pete Davison in this post makes a case in favor of curated retro gaming by looking at the Evercade, a new cartridge-based handheld designed to run collections of old Atari games [edit: and NES, SNES, and Genesis/Megadrive games as of this writing — thanks to Pete for the correction.] It’s quite a convincing case as well, considering the questionable legality of ROMs and emulators and the sheer abundance of garbage games that clog up those massive catalogues, drowning out some of the real gems that may have been forgotten if they weren’t given new life by being put into these kinds of compilations.

『GRATEFUL IN ALL THINGS』art gallery by Osamu Sato & Deconstructing LSD — Browsercrasher recounts a visit to an exhibition of art by Osamu Sato, the chief mind behind the weird PS1 classic LSD Dream Simulator. It looks as bizarre and fascinating as you’d expect if you’ve played or seen footage of that game.

Artbook Review – FF DOT: The Pixel Art of Final Fantasy — In this post, Krystallina takes a look at FF DOT, a collection of Final Fantasy sprite art. We need more artbook reviews, so I’m always happy to see new ones. In fact, I have a few new ones I might write about myself now.

Visual Novel Theatre- Analog: A Hate Story — We also need more visual novel reviews. I’ll keep doing my part, but here’s Aether with an insightful review of Christine Love’s VN Analog: A Hate Story.

Super Mario Bros. (all versions) — Here’s a concept I like: a side-by-side review of three versions of one game, in this case the classic Super Mario Bros. by Neppy. Maybe I’ll do one of these comparing the original Sonic the Hedgehog to its horribly botched port on the GBA. Well, never mind, I just gave away the ending. I’m still pissed off about Sonic Genesis though, even today.

New Super Mario Bros. 2 — Continuing the Mario review theme, be sure to check out Red Metal’s review of New Super Mario Bros. 2 and of many of the other games in the series.

Character Analysis: Misaki Nakahara — And finally, from the Overage Otaku, an in-depth analysis of Misaki Nakahara from the anime version of Welcome to the NHK! Misaki is not what she seems at first, and this post does a fine job at examining what makes her interesting.

That’s all for this month. Let’s hope some good things happen in June, though the odds don’t seem to be great for that. Until next time, my best wishes to all of you, no matter where you are on Earth. Or why stop there, even if you’re in space right now and somehow reading this.

16 thoughts on “Listening/reading log #8 (May 2020)

  1. Thank you so much for the mention! 🙂 This log is packed with information! I’m starting with Neon Impasse and I love the vibe already. I will be sure to pay attention to your music reviews in the future because this is awesome!

    • No problem! And thanks, I hope you enjoy the music reviews. I usually try cover both old and new stuff to mix things up. Just discovered City Girl and I’m looking out for more interesting stuff like that.

  2. I don’t think I even mentioned this but I love the layout of this blog. It’s so clean but interesting.
    Also thank you so much for the mention. I got distracted by great design!

  3. Thanks for the link! I’ll just add to your description that the Evercade is more than just Atari games — it has the power to support up to PS1-level stuff, according to the developers. At the time of release, the cartridges cover NES, SNES and Mega Drive releases, with some Atari Lynx stuff coming later in the year, and arcade titles coming next year.

    • Ah, sorry — I’ll fix that in the description as well, thanks. I knew that but my brain didn’t translate that properly onto the page somehow.

  4. Thank you for the link! I must admit I would be interested in you covering the differences between the original Sonic the Hedgehog and the GBA version, but I’m not a sadist so I can understand if you don’t want to 😉

    • You know, I might actually do it if I get bored or want to change things up. But I’d probably have to emulate Sonic Genesis. I think the sale of that game is banned according to the Geneva Convention or something.

  5. Nice selections. I tend to listen to a lot of the jazz stations/playlists when doing WordPress stuff so plenty of Stan Getz has come on. I remember hearing The Girl From Impanema a few years ago before it finally clicked “I know this song on an episode of Rocko’s Modern Life!”

    • Thanks! I think jazz is a nice unobtrusive style to put on when you’re working or writing, maybe unless you’re talking about free jazz or acid jazz or something.

      I remember watching Rocko’s Modern Life way back in the day but I don’t remember hearing that song in an episode. I can definitely believe it, though, it’s so over the place.

      • It was the episode The Lounge Singer, at the end Filbert is singing to Ed & Bev Bighead. The song was to the tune of Girl from Impanema “Short and fat and green warty, the toads…” The episode also began with him singing “Come Crawl With Me”, which took me a while as a kid to realize was a play on the Sinatra song. Kinda like all those Twilight Zone or Citizen Kane references throughout episodes of the Simpsons…

  6. Yeah, the description of The Girl from Ipanema hits it exactly. I remember getting this stuck in my head tons of time, yet never really knowing what to look for to find it. That’s one ear worm made manageable, thanks.

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