Listening/reading log #7 (April 2020)

Nothing significant happened this April. It was totally normal. So let’s move on to the usual: some music and some notable posts from other writers from the past month.

The Name of this Band is Talking Heads (Talking Heads, 1981)

Highlights: A Clean Break, Love → Building on Fire, Life During Wartime

Another live album, yeah. This one is a real favorite, though, as it should be. Talking Heads started as part of a mid-70s New York City scene playing at the same clubs as guys like the Ramones, which is weird to imagine when you hear how god damn nerdy they sound with David Byrne’s nervous warbly singing and how precise their playing is. I really like them, and I like The Name of this Band is Talking Heads because it lets you hear the band both near their start in the late 70s and around their peak in the early 80s — they sound a lot bigger and fuller in the later tracks, but it’s all good stuff. Catchy, memorable, energetic. If you only know Talking Heads because the local grocery store won’t stop playing “Wild Wild Life”, check this album out to see how much better they were than that (not that it’s a bad song, but it is way overplayed and not nearly as good as the older stuff. There, now I sound like a snob again.)

The remastered CD version also has an extended tracklist, so that’s the one to get, though I don’t even know if you can find the original one outside of used vinyl stores anymore.

新しい日の誕生/Birth of a New Day (2814, 2015)

Highlights: It’s all kind of the same song

I have to be in a certain mood to listen to this kind of music. Maybe a brooding mood or a foul one, which happens often enough to make it worth my while to find stuff like 新しい日の誕生/Birth of a New Day by the group 2814. This music is supposed to fall into the “vaporwave” category, but that seems like such a broad category that I’m not sure what it even means, and it doesn’t sound anything like the few other vaporwave albums I’ve heard. There are no vocals aside from a few samples, and each track flows into the next. Sort of like Geogaddi, I don’t know if I’d call this relaxing exactly, but it’s not quite as unsettling as that album is.

Try this out if you’re in a brooding mood too. Maybe it can work as therapeutic or meditative music or something. I like to use that “lofi hip hop radio” channel on Youtube, the one with the constant loop of the anime girl studying. You know the one; it’s probably in your recommended videos.

And now, the featured posts:

The Benefits Rant — Aether writes some thoughts about processing benefits applications for a government agency during the coronavirus outbreak and brings up some issues about government benefits that are probably easy to forget about if you’re not working in that field.

A Rebuttal to James Whitbrook: Our Fascination With Canon Is Not Killing the Way We Value Stories — Some critics are all too happy to ignore plot holes or acknowledge them but claim they shouldn’t matter, justifying sloppy writing and poor characterization, as long as the work in question delivers what they think is the right message. Red Metal breaks down these arguments in an interesting rebuttal.

A Character Analysis of Two Gilgameshes — Type-Moon has its own take on the ancient epic hero Gilgamesh, who’s appeared in several of its Fate series as a blonde pretty boy with magical powers. Scott analyzes two very different versions of Gilgamesh in this piece.

Touhou 2 – Story of Eastern Wonderland Review — I’ve had Touhou Project on the mind lately, partly because I’m following blogs posting about the series. Yomu is writing a series of reviews of the main line Touhou shoot-em-ups. The old PC-98 games that came out before Touhou really blew up get somewhat ignored, so it’s nice to see them getting some attention.

Touhou: Luna Nights — And Neppy reminds me that I need to get around to playing Touhou Luna Nights with this review of the Metroidvania spinoff.

I also have some massive posts planned for the near-future depending on how strictly you define “near.” Until then!