Going to the backlog

This is an unexpectedly slow month for the site, partly because of personal circumstances and partly because of how the coronavirus has fucked my work situation. Luckily for me, despite all the worry over the virus, individual people and big ass corporate entities alike will continue to sue each other, so I still do have work. I’m thankful for that, but obviously conditions have changed and we’ve all had to adapt. All this also means that I haven’t had much time to play anything in the last month or so. However, I still have a fair backlog of games to get through piled up in my Steam account. A lot of us are stuck inside for an indefinite period of time, so what better time to catch up on that? Not that I was ever much for going outside anyway.

Here are some of the impressions I have of the games I’ve started. It’s not an exhaustive list, and there’s definitely no guarantee that I will get through all, most, or even any of these. Since I’m doing my best to economize and actually play the fucking games I buy during Steam sales, however, they’re the ones I’m most likely to play in the near future (aside from Persona 5 Royal, which yes, of course I have preordered. Atlus hasn’t let me down yet, except once, and those P3 and P5 dancing games were still basically decent despite the ripoff price.)

Rabi-Ribi

In what’s undoubtedly the biggest shock of the decade so far, I bought a game featuring a bunch of cute animal-eared girls. I know, really unexpected. But that’s not the only reason I got Rabi-Ribi (I won’t lie — it’s a reason, just not the only one.) This is a combination platformer/bullet hell game about Erina, a regular rabbit who mysteriously turns into a rabbit-eared/tailed human one day. So she has to figure out how and why that happened by seeking out her human owner and her other friends, and these adventures involve a lot of bullet hell-style boss fights with other girls.

If you’d say that this sounds a hell of a lot like a Touhou Project game, I would agree. Aside from the fact that it’s a platformer instead of a vertically scrolling shooter, I get strong Touhou vibes from Rabi-Ribi so far. It’s all about cute girls shooting bullets and lasers at each other in a fantasy setting, so there you go — basically a Touhou game. I’m really liking it so far, though I might end up regretting playing the game in normal mode instead of novice mode. But that would just hurt my pride too much, even if I am generally pretty lousy at games like this.

LiEat

This is a strange one — a trilogy of what look like RPGMaker games (or maybe WolfRPG; I tend to lump all these kinds of games together) bundled together for a few dollars on Steam. I like stuff like that, so I thought why not drop a few dollars on LiEat. The first game starts out with a pair of travelers: Leo, an experienced, hardened kind of guy, and Efina, a dragon girl who recently hatched from an egg and is in the process of figuring the world out. Efina can also “eat” lies somehow — when someone tells a lie, it manifests as a monster that you can fight and defeat in a turn-based battle.

I’m not too far into it yet, but LiEat is interesting so far. I like strange games like this, and it also doesn’t seem to be that much of a time investment even if it is a bundle of three games.

Yuppie Psycho

Okay, I haven’t even started Yuppie Psycho yet, but I am 99% sure I’d like it from everything I’ve seen and heard of it. So why haven’t I played it yet? I don’t know, but I’ll try to fix that soon. All I know is that it’s a horror game about Brian Pasternack, the young panicked-looking guy in the suit above, starting a new job at a big corporation. It looks like there’s a lot of weird Lovecraftian shit going on, and there’s some kind of AI/android girl in there, and the soundtrack was composed by Garoad, the same guy who made the amazing BGM for VA-11 HALL-A. This game was pretty much made for me, so I will probably get around to playing it soon.

Momodora IV: Reverie Under the Moonlight

This game has been sitting in my backlog for so long that it should have grown some mold by now. It was sitting there so long that the developer has since released a new game, Minoria, that I also haven’t played. I still intend to get around to Momodora IV sometime though. I really liked Momodora II, though part of the reason for that was its being free — but it was legitimately fun, and IV looks and plays a lot more polished. Protagonist Kaho is a shrine maiden and the ancestor of Momo from Momodora II, and she’s going on a similar kind of quest to banish some evil somewhere with a close-range fan weapon and a long-range bow. This is another game that seems to demand some dexterity and skill. It doesn’t even bother to hold your hand in the first area. I like a challenge (even if, again, I’m not great at stuff like this) so that’s fine with me. I’ll get through it eventually. Someday.

Evenicle

When I wrote in my last post that I had picked up Evenicle, I was serious. Since then, in fact, I’ve gotten all the way to the third chapter of the game, which feels like the start of the mid-game in terms of pacing. Evenicle is a turn-based RPG made by Alicesoft, and if you know Alicesoft you know what that means. If you don’t know Alicesoft, it means that this game is full of sex scenes and would probably somehow offend at least 80% of anyone taken off the street at random. Just look up the Rance series and you’ll see what I mean, but don’t do it at work.

Despite a couple of fucked but not unexpected moments (again, not unexpected if you know Alicesoft) I like Evenicle so far. The turn-based combat is pretty basic but works well, and the characters are well-written, even if a lot of the women are throwing themselves at the protagonist Aster. But that’s the whole point, anyway: you’re helping Aster build a giant polygamist household (my favorite wife so far: Riche, though I get the feeling Kathryn might steal that spot when she figures into the plot more.) And to be fair to Evenicle, it’s making Aster earn at least some of the love he gets through his being a generally good-natured guy with a ton of motivation and ability. He’s not just some bland dumbass of an RPG protagonist, in other words: he has an actual personality and some traits that make you believe people would want to be around him.

Also, the character art in Evenicle was done by Nan Yaegashi, the Senran Kagura artist, and I’m the kind of idiot who will buy a game or watch an anime series just because it features the work of an artist I like. It really is fantastic artwork, though. I still wouldn’t recommend this game to most people yet, but you probably don’t need my word on it anyway — Evenicle seems to be one of those “you probably already know if it’s for you” sorts of games just from looking at the title screen and reading the synopsis.

***

So those are the games sitting at the top of my backlog list. I’m hoping that maybe this apocalypse we’re living through will at least give me the opportunity to get through some more of these games instead of being forced to go outside and actually talk to real people in real life. How about I just quarantine myself forever? Why isn’t that an option?

6 thoughts on “Going to the backlog

  1. I really enjoyed LiEat, it was short but pretty good. Unfortunately don’t remember a lot about it so I guess I’ll have to play it soon ^^. I also still want to play Rabi-Rabi, but my scrooge mindset has avoided me from doing so right now.

    • Yeah, I’m the same way. I think I got Rabi-Ribi during a Steam sale along with the rest of these. From the one or two hours I’ve played so far, it’s good.

  2. The artwork and music of Momodora really reminds me of OneShot, so I was surprised when I learned they were different artists. The 2010s was a weird decade in that it was a great period of Metroidvanias between stuff like Ori and the Blind Forest, Monster Boy and the Cursed Kingdom, and Axiom Verge, yet it was a dismal period for both Metroid and Castlevania between Metroid: Other M and Konami’s meltdown.

    • It’s funny how that’s worked out, how the small independent studios can run so far ahead of the AAA developers. I know you’ve talked about how those indie projects like OneShot can achieve things much bigger budget titles can’t. That’s part of why I’m focusing on those kinds of games. Price also plays a big part.

      • Yeah, the independent scene ended up leaving the AAA industry in the dust in the mid-2010s, and they haven’t looked back. Among other reasons, I think they have much more focus; it’s often better to implement one idea extremely well than several ideas only semi-competently. A lot of AAA games during that time had a “more content = better” mentality, which caused their games to become very repetitive quickly.

  3. Pingback: Mystery Blogger Award from Ospreyshire | Extra Life

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