An open letter to my friends in the practice of law

Today I’m doing something I’d typically never think of doing: showing some goodwill to my fellow humans.

What a ridiculous thought

Okay, I’m really not that bitter and miserable all the time. But sometimes I am, and it’s easy to forget at those times that I rely upon other people, just as the rest of us do. The most excellent Irina from the site I drink and watch anime (who also happened to take one of the best ideas for a site name that I didn’t think of myself) reminded me of this when she nominated me for the Blogging Chums Award established by one beams19. The rules follow:

This may seem like a bit of an odd award but I think it’s so important to tell the people closest to us how much we care about them, and in a world that is so full of hate and division, it’s the little things we do that can help make a big impact – so go tell someone you love them!

This award isn’t compulsory by any means but if you decide to take part, it would mean the world to me. I wonder if there will ever be a day when I’m scrolling through WordPress Reader and I see the Blogging Chum Award floating around on other blogs!”

The Rules:

Be sure to use the award image! (note: made by the author of Daring to Impress, which seems to be focused on fashion and such)
List the rules & about paragraph!
Thank whoever nominated you!
Write a letter to someone who means a lot to you to spread some positivity around the Internet – anyone will do!
Nominate 5 more people for the award and go let them know about it in their comments!

 

That’s some challenge. I could certainly thank any one of my fellow writers for their support and for doing what they do, and I do want to give my thanks to them. As the title suggests, though, there’s another group of people I want to thank today: my friends at the bar.  (The legal bar, not the bar you drink at, though I sometimes go to that kind of bar and meet friends there.)  I’m certain none of them will read this post, but if any do out of pure coincidence, it would make me happy, even if I am maintaining my anonymity here.

The practice of law is rough, frustrating, and dirty for many attorneys.  Some of us work in family law representing husbands and wives in the process of divorcing, splitting goods and property and the custody of children.  Some of us represent clients before administrative agencies with massive backlogs.  Some of us prosecute criminal defendants and some of us defend them in a criminal justice system that often seems twisted and backwards and stacked against the poor and working people, despite our stated standard of justice for all.  A few of us – fewer than most people realize – work at large firms for corporate clients, making big salaries but billing unbelievable numbers of hours per year, to the point that our free evenings and weekends are reduced or vanish altogether.  And 99% of the law is extremely unglamorous, no matter what part of it you practice.

“Counsel, please stop shouting and pointing at everyone.”

We all have one thing in common, though: we’re all subject to more or less the same rules of ethics, and we all bust our asses to make our clients and bosses happy.  And sometimes the effort required to perform the necessary work and maintain our ethical standards causes a lot of stress.  There’s a reason law is one of the highest-ranked professions in instances of depression, alcohol and drug abuse, and suicide.  I’ve gone through experiences in my brief time as a lawyer that made me seriously question my decision to go to law school and sit for the bar.  Our own state bar association is finally acknowledging the problem, but aside from a help line and a referral program to mental health professionals, it doesn’t offer much in the way of aid.  And to be honest, it can’t – this profession is what it is, and there’s only so much you can do about the level of stress it causes its practitioners.

That’s why I’m writing this post to my friends in the practice of law.  I won’t lie – this profession does contain assholes, blowhards, and backstabbers.  But it also contains a lot of faithful, trustworthy, and classy people.  From my experience (and despite popular opinion) the second type of lawyer is more common than the first.  The friends I made as a law student and an attorney have given me a great deal of help with their support and advice, perhaps more than they know.  To those friends, I can only give my thanks and express my hope that I will always rank among the second type of lawyer and not the first.

As for the nominations – this is where I hit a wall.  As I’ve said before, this blog is a bit of a dead end since I’ve been out of the networking loop for the last, uh, five and a half years or so.  That’s something I’m trying to change, but for the time being, I will go ahead and tag The Otaku Judge and also Pete over at MoeGamer – no pressure, of course, and I haven’t seen the good Judge around for a while, but hopefully he’ll make his return soon.

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4 thoughts on “An open letter to my friends in the practice of law

  1. That second type of lawyer exists – even if fiction doesn’t like to acknowledge it. In fact, there are a lot of parts of the human condition about which supposedly realistic fiction is frequently off the mark (which is to say, it’s overly negative about). It’s said that good people make for boring stories, but that’s a sign of creative bankruptcy more than anything else.

    • I could go on about fictional representations of lawyers. Weirdly enough, two of my favorite fictional lawyers are the ones I posted in the above images. As you might imagine, most “realistic” courtroom/lawyer movies and shows are anything but. The only one I really like is My Cousin Vinny.

      And I agree that good people can make for good stories. All you need is an interesting conflict.

  2. Thank you very much for the nomination. I envy the salary some lawyers make, but could never handle the profession. You have more mental/emotional fortitude than me to handle that field, plus I value free time to much. Reduced weekends? That’s the only time I get to make a dent in my anime/gaming backlog.

    • Some people take to this profession much better than I do. I miss my free time, but I’m now at a job that lets me not think about work at all when I’ve returned home. My last job wasn’t like that, and it poisoned the little free time I had. Never again.

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